Regional Collaboration and Conference Grants

Upcoming Lilly Fellows Regional Conferences

 

Higher Education's Moral Obligation of Addressing Addiction: A Humanities Response

University of Pikeville, Pikeville, Kentucky

This conference will be held virtually on Friday, February 19, 2021. Registration is free. Click here to register.
Today as almost 21 million Americans are addicted and drug overdose deaths have more than tripled since 1990, universities are being confronted with this crisis through its students yet more profoundly through the tidal wave of impact on student’s families and surrounding communities. Annually the USA spends over $600 billion every year due to addiction and the traditional age of college students is the most likely demographic to become addicted. With staggering facts like these, very few would argue that the country does not have an addiction crisis on its hands, yet does an institution of higher education have a moral obligation to address this issue? Can such things as theatre, art, music, language, English, film, history, classics, and religion address this crisis? We are looking for quality presentations intended for instructors and professors of disciplines within humanities who are currently or propose to address the addiction crisis through a course, a community engagement action, or curriculum. We seek innovative ideas and passion to address this moral crisis.
A Call for Proposals: Abstract Submission Deadline is January 25, 2021. Presentations will be 45 minutes in length. Notice of acceptance/rejection will be sent out by January 29, 2021. Click here to submit a proposal.

Reckoning and Reimagining: Envisioning a Faithful Presence

Azusa Pacific University, Azusa, California

 


 

Religion, State, and Nationalism: Problems and Possibilities

Valparaiso University, Valparaiso, Indiana

This conference has been postponed. The new date will be in the 2020-2021 academic year, specific date to be announced later.

Valparaiso University invites you to a special symposium, “Religion, State, and Nationalism: Problems and Possibilities." The symposium will take place in three sessions, with the first focusing on problems, the second on possibilities, and the third on integrating issues of faith, nationalism, and the problems of historical memory into undergraduate curricula.

Description: Today’s world is witnessing to new configurations of alliances and conflicts between religious institutions and the state. Religion is a key player in rewriting nationalist narratives that underpin state policies. In the United States, evangelical Christians influence state policies and contribute to nationalist agendas. The Orthodox Church is a leader in the resurgence of nationalism in post-Soviet Russia and the rehabilitation of the mythological past of “Holy Russia” that contributes to the state’s ideological agenda. Analysts express concern that religion will fuel the flames of nationalist isolationism and increase the possibilities for international incidents of polarization, violence, and war. Critics call for the complete separation of religious organizations from the state. In some places of the world, cooperation between religious institutions and the state can become a positive force at the local and international levels. Religious leaders can consult the state and contribute to the formation of national identity that is inclusive and does not pose a threat to international peace.

Confirmed panelists:

Antoine Arjakovsky, Collège de Bernardins, Paris
Scott Hibbard, DePaul University, Chicago
Atalia Omer, University of Notre Dame, South Bend
Robert Saler, Christian Theological Seminary, Indianapolis
Dorian Llywelyn, S.J., Santa Clara University
Slavica Jakelic, Valparaiso University
Timothy Larsen, Wheaton College
Philipp Gollner, Goshen College
Samuel Graber, Valparaiso University


Description and Guidelines for Regional Collaboration and Conferences

Regional Collaboration and Conferences Grants represent a flexible category of programs that encourage examination of topics of special significance to faculty, administrators, and students at a particular institution or group of institutions, or matters of special intellectual concern to faculty and others in Christian higher education. The focus, character, and constituency of the conference, collaboration, or workshop may vary to suit the needs of the applicant, within the general guidelines listed above. Previous successful conferences, collaborations, and workshops have focused on issues facing schools in a particular region, topics of current debate among faculty at a particular school, student life issues, graduate student matters, various theological or denominational traditions in higher education, an array of topics in liberal and professional education, and issues of civic and public concern to the Christian intellectual community.

Funding is available for any number of Regional Collaborations or Conferences taking place in the 2020-2021 academic year at $12,500 each. It is expected that in many cases the host institution or group of institutions may also contribute to funding the conference. Institutions that have already received a grant in this category are typically not be eligible in the same category again for three years after the original grant was awarded. Nevertheless, at present, such schools can re-apply for a Regional Collaboration or Conference Grant if the application demonstrates that the proposed project addresses a different audience than the previously funded one. Although Regional Conferences or Workshops represent a flexible category of programs, priority is given to applications for programs that connect representatives from campuses within a particular geographical region.

Application to host a Regional Collaboration or Conference

 


Current Regional Conferences and Collaborations

Matter and Spirit: A Seminar on Contemporary Chinese Art and Society
June 15- July 1, 2018

The Nagel Institute, in partnership with the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities and the Lilly Network of Church-Related Colleges and Universities, held a seminar and studio project in China for June 15- July 1, 2018. The seminar will be followed by an international traveling exhibition of the resulting works of art beginning in fall, 2019. 

This project convened 10 North American and 10 Chinese artists in a two-week seminar and studio event in Beijing, Nanjing, and Shanghai. Participants  engaged the realities of contemporary urban China, the Chinese visual arts scene, and each other. They especially focused on how some prominent Chinese contemporary artists have created art in response to these conditions, how Chinese Christians see both “matter and spirit” interacting, and how the struggle for integrity in China might inspire and reshape their own life work.

This seminar, “Matter and Spirit,” is the third in a series of international art projects, preceded by a seminar in Indonesia in 2008 that resulted in the “Charis” traveling exhibit, and a seminar in South Africa in 2013 followed by a traveling exhibit, “Between the Shadow and the Light.” “Matter and Spirit,” like the two preceding exhibits, will open at the annual Lilly Network conference on the arts and humanities in 2019.

Learn more about past Regional Collaborations and Conferences here.

 

Noteworthy News

November LFP Update

The Current LFP Update for November 2020 is now available. Click here.


2021-2023 Postdoctoral Fellowship now accepting applications

The Lilly Fellows Postdoctoral Teaching Fellowship in the Humanities and the Arts is accepting applications. For more information and to apply, click here.


Regional Conference: Higher Education's Moral Obligation of Addressing Addiction: A Humanities Response

The University of Pikeville will host an online regional conference on the opioid crisis. Do institutions of higher education have a moral obligation to address this crisis? Can such things as theatre, art, music, language, English, film, history, classics, and religion address this crisis? For more information about registration and a call for papers, click here.


Regional Conference: Reckoning and Reimagining: Envisioning a Faithful Presence

Save the date! Azusa Pacific University will host an online regional conference, Reckoning and Reimagining: Envisioning a Faithful Presence on May 26-27, 2021. This diverse, interdisciplinary conference will offer insights, theory, and research for reimagining the liberal arts and a robust response to the global enduring impacts of COVID-19 related to health, justice, politics, and the economy. Click here for more information.


Announcing the 2021 LFP Book Award

We are now accepting nominations for the 2021 LFP Book Award. Please nominate books that exemplifies the central ideas animating the LFP by March 1, 2021. See here for more information.


Announcing the winner of the 2020 Arlin G. Meyer Prize

We are pleased to announce that Stephen Heyde of Baylor University has won the 2020 Arlin G. Meyer Prize in the Performing Arts for Gustav Mahler Symphony No. 2. For more information and to hear the piece performed, please see our official announcement.


New edition of Leading Lives that Matter released

In their second edition of Leading Lives That Matter, editors Mark Schwehn and Dorothy Bass compile a wide range of texts—from ancient and contemporary literature, social commentary, and philosophy—related to questions of vital interest for those who are trying to decide what to do with their lives and what kind of human beings they hope to become. Leading Lives that Matter has been an important text in many of our fellowship and grant programs, and it contains excellent resources. Click here for more information and an excerpt.


Lilly Network of Church- Related Colleges and Universities

If you are interested in learning more about membership in the Lilly Network of Church-Related Colleges and Universities, please contact us here.